Pre-Mutiny – A Young Managers Greatest Challenge

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You’ve been watching that young superstar’s performance and your keen sense of talent development makes you confident that they’ve got the leadership skills to move the performance needle in a management role. Before you reward them with a promotion, be sure to acknowledge “Pre-Mutiny” and build a strategy around it! Otherwise, you’ll be feeding your protégé to the wolves of jealousy. This happened to me as a fresh faced 24-year-old in his first corporate management gig, and I would have never survived without my mentor (Nate Mathes)!

What is Pre-Mutiny? It all starts with the team or departmental dynamics and the roster of candidates who WILL NOT be getting that management opportunity. The assumption here is that your future star will be managing these competing peers turned employees. Ageism is in play here, as your young superstar is facing a challenge that requires thick skin, courage, open support, and strong mentoring. Pre-Mutiny is when a young manager is rendered ineffective because the team won’t respond appropriately to their attempt to lead and support. Most of the time it is a collective boycott of cooperation as a unified statement of “no confidence” inspired by ignorance, jealousy, and negative leadership.

As a senior manager, what do you do to protect your prized prospect as they get called up to “The Show”? Here are some tips:

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1 – Identify Potential Threats – If you have good political acumen you might be able to anticipate which employees would have a problem with your decision.  If you don’t know who the threat could be, put your ear to the street to tap into the corporate grapevine or leverage existing managers’ knowledge of staff to determine which personnel to worry about. My mentor (Nate) knew exactly who to be worried about and he was very right.

2 – Cut the Head Off – Each example of Pre-Mutiny has one or two dominant personalities that have real leadership skills, but they use them for evil rather than good. These negative leaders know how to recruit support and influence team attitudes. Kept unchecked, they will round up the posse and both quietly and openly work to discredit your young manager’s credibility and impact. My mentor openly challenged a negative leader to support my efforts, instead of attempting to stunt my progress.

3 – Present a United Front – As a senior manager you must cash in some of your corporate capital as a respected leader to convey an overwhelming amount of support for the new manager towards others. You must plan to literally (physically) stand by your youthful managerial selection to drive home the point that they are the selection and nothing is changing that. In other words, “Like it or not, this is your reality. Deal with it, adjust, and work as a team.” One way to present a united front is to be a part of the formal transition or introductory meeting, as well as attending some future team meetings so your presence is felt while your candidate builds trust, credibility, and establishes their management style. My mentor took a chance and trusted I would evolve despite a major lack of experience, and he did so folding his arms behind me as I ran through the meeting agenda (he is an imposing figure, picture Apollo Creed).

Build your plan to proactively address Pre-Mutiny and preserve your young manager’s early success. If they are as talented as you think, they will learn to use the same courage and persistence that my mentor taught me.